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Homecoming

Oct 31, 2008 ● By Super Admin

From our nation’s earliest beginnings, war has been a part of American life. So too has “homecoming” - the return of our veterans from the battlefield. Where war shapes the face of the nation, our veterans provide its heart and soul, both literally and figuratively. But with each new theatre, and each long-awaited homecoming, we still find ourselves wrestling with the same issues of care and reintegration of veterans into civilian life. While a large majority of our veterans return safely to us and successfully rejoin civilian life, there is a persistent and troubling number of veterans who don’t. Our veterans return from war forever changed by their experiences, and families are often the first to witness this change. Excited anticipation gives way to confusion and frustration with the realization that the person who shipped out isn’t the same as the veteran now returning home. And while there are a growing number of organizations that offer direct, immediate counseling for veterans, there are surprisingly few offering long-term or ongoing support to families of veterans.John Henry Parker, a Sacramento local and former US Marine, found this out the hard way. In late 2003, Parker’s son, Sergeant Danny Facto was serving his second tour with the Army’s 10th Mountain Division in Afghanistan. Positioned in one of the most dangerous battlegrounds in the Afghan-Iraq war, the 10th Mountain had been the focus of recent media attention, appearing on Peter Jennings’ “World News Tonight." Shortly thereafter, Danny called home to his father. “He said he was having some serious reservations about coming home. He didn’t really understand how he was going to make the stretch back to being a parent and a husband after what he’d been going through. It was just, kind of an alarming phone call to get out of the blue,” recalled Parker.Parker, resolved to do everything he could to seek out counseling for Danny, and guidance for he and his family on how to deal with this new set of events unfolding. The results of John’s search, or lack thereof, were disturbing. “Kind of naively, I thought especially with the homecoming problems we had with Vietnam, that we as a society would have some kind of organization or support group for parents and family members to help with this traumatic transition, says Parker. He goes on to say, “I was in the Marine Corps, raised by a father who was a combat veteran…so I was hoping there was something out there, but I just didn’t find anything.”In his search for answers, Parker began meeting other families struggling with the same issues. He began talking to people in the mental health field, within the VA, and in the media, and out of those conversations an idea was born. Parker decided to form his own non-profit organization, called Veterans and Families, dedicated to assisting veterans and their loved ones through the difficult period known as “homecoming.” Throughout 2004­­­­ and 2005, Veterans and Families ran a series of focus groups, with a core group of attendees, mainly spouses, some veterans, as well as Vietnam veterans. It was here Parker gained valuable insight into the relationships between veterans and their family members, particularly spouses. Parker recalls, “You know, when it came right down to it, they were really angry and upset because they’d been good military spouses, they’d done everything they were asked to do and yet after all this is said and done [the veterans] are coming home saying ‘I love you but I can’t live with you, I need my space.’”Eventually hampered by the fact that no list of returning military and family members was available on an ongoing basis, the support groups gave way to a formidable Web presence, which remains and continues to grow today. The Veterans and Families Web  site, veteransandfamilies.org, is an extensive Web portal linking to numerous civilian non-profit, government and media Web sites. Available for download is the crowning achievement of Veterans and Families: The Homecoming Preparedness Guide.This 15-page guide provides crucial insight into the veteran’s mindset, allowing family members to learn how their veteran has changed, and help families move into a new and more realistic understanding of their loved one. It also offers veterans valuable insight into the feelings that his or her family may be going through, and is an invaluable resource for both veterans and their loved ones, at any stage of homecoming.“Our biggest piece of advice that we offer families for every single person outside of the veteran is: manage your expectations,” says Parker. “Manage your expectations around what’s important to the veteran coming home. And start by asking the very easy question of ‘How do you want to spend your first hours/days/weeks/months at home?’” Asking this question is often a good reality check for family members. If expectations go unmanaged and these kinds of questions aren’t asked, resentment begins to breed and can quickly accelerate into a negative spiral. One of the most striking aspects of the Homecoming Preparedness Guide is its simplicity. It outlines scenarios such as if a veteran is noticeably edgy in a restaurant, changing the seating arrangement can help them to feel more comfortable. John elaborates, “I’ve got several spouses who call me and say, ‘You know what, everything in that guide happened. We went to a restaurant and I asked for a corner table so he could actually sit in the corner and watch everything that’s going on in the room, and not only did he appreciate it, he actually opened up and started talking to me, which hadn’t been happening.’”The breakthroughs that come from the right kind of actions are much more long lasting and more deeply felt by the veteran than words. Through the Web site, Veterans and Families remains constantly connected to the “homecoming” process at all stages. “We’re getting people that are saying, 'My husband’s coming home, I’m scared to death…his emails, his voicemails, his messages, he’s changed.’” For veterans who reach “critical mass,” Parker says Vet Centers are the single best resource, of which there are 232 nationwide. Though significantly overstretched, the Vet Centers are equipped to deal specifically with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).One important tool the Vet centers use in treatment programs is getting veterans from similar conflicts into the same room together. To Parker, that method is key; “Nobody really understands a combat veteran better than another combat veteran.” Parker’s son Danny showed him this when he interacted with other veterans during Veterans and Families focus groups. “[With other veterans] he’s not my son Danny, he’s back in the role of a sergeant and a squad leader even though he’s out of the military now. He talks to these guys directly and gets right to the point, ‘You’re telling me you’re okay. How much sleep are you getting? How much are you drinking?’ Veterans have a way of communicating with each other that is a real brotherhood and sisterhood.” Parker is pragmatic and prefers that the military adopt what he calls a “mandatory decompression process.” Parker says, “If it’s important that we have an all-volunteer military in the future, we better release people back into society in a way that helps them manage and cope with what they will encounter. Veterans are reluctant to seek counseling [and] this is a real problem. Instead, Parker believes that there is value in self-help, something that is especially valuable for veterans. “When I got out of the military, an officer really changed my life and shifted my focus,” recalls Parker. “He said, ‘you’re going to get out of the military in a couple of weeks, and what’s interesting is the world is exactly the same. You’ve changed.’” On the officer’s advice Parker visited the nearest bookstore and embraced self-help names like Napoleon Hill, David Schwartz and Maxwell Maltz. Whatever civilians may think of the “personal development” phenomenon, when you’re someone who is truly looking for help, books like these can set you on the right mental path.  In his experience with Veterans and Families, the biggest lesson that Parker has learned is that veterans and their families are ultimately, and understandably, very private about “homecoming” and its aftermath. “After all the things we thought we wanted to do, the Homecoming Preparedness Guide was most relevant. If the legacy of Veterans and Families is that those in need can access the Homecoming Preparedness Guide from the privacy of their own homes, and start to understand how to make the journey back to normalcy, then that alone is a legacy that Parker can be proud of. In 2007, through Veterans and Families, Parker helped launch the Warrior Transition Project, which partners with an organization called Brain State Conditioning, using neurofeedback treatment to find an alternative form of treating the symptoms of PTSD. The Veterans and Families Web site provides a number of first-hand testimonials from veterans attesting to the success of the treatments. Parker’s ongoing drive to explore new opportunities and to find hope where there seems to be none, is embodied in the Veterans and Families organization, and shows veterans that just as they fought for us, there are people here who are willing to fight for them. As is with any non-profit organization, funding is the key to Veterans and Families’ ongoing success. With the help of Bobbi Parks, CEO of the Lincoln Chamber of Commerce and proud mother of an Iraq Marine Combat Veteran, Veterans and Families is currently evaluating the unmet needs of homecoming veterans and their family members to continually align their focus with current and future needs. Parker says, “[Parks] will hopefully be assuming more of a leadership role in the future with the organization. She is an incredible person, spokesperson and leader.”  And what of John’s son Danny? He’s been out of the military now for a few years and adjusting into civilian and college life while pursuing a Masters in Clinical Social Work, which will allow him to counsel other veterans. Life still is not without its ups and downs, and John, Danny and the family still take it day by day. “We talk about the future but we seem to talk more about how he’s doing right now.”To download the Homecoming Preparedness Guide, make donations, or for more information about veterans’ issues, check out <a target="_blank" href="http://www.veteransandfamilies.org">veteransandfamilies.org</a>.<hr>For more information about getting involved, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Highland Dancing

Oct 31, 2008 ● By Super Admin

The Scottish tradition of Highland dancing is alive and well in El Dorado Hills. Two area girls dancing in the tradition of their forefathers are Emma and Mary Larsen, who both started classes with Kyla Groeschel at the School of Highland Dance in Fair Oaks about a year ago.Emma and Mary started dancing at the age of three and have studied various forms of dance ever since. Sixteen-year-old Mary performs several times each month with her high school dance team in jazz and hip hop, and several times per year with Groeschel in Highland dance. She has competed in Irish dance in the past and now participates in numerous competitions, traveling as far as Las Vegas and Palm Springs. Thirteen-year-old Emma also competes in Highland and has competed at the Prizewinner level in Irish dancing.Both girls take part in the annual Sacramento St. Patrick’s Day parade in Old Sacramento (hosted by Old Sacramento Business Association, Old Sacramento Management and Embarcadero Lions Club), and this year Mary was named Miss Shamrock 2008 by the Shamrock Club of Sacramento. Her duties included riding in a convertible in the parade and making various television and in-person public appearances to promote the parade. Emma and Mary have performed at several television stations to promote the events they participate in, such as the Sacramento Highland Games and the Sacramento Shamrock Club events.The girls’ proud mother, Laura Larsen (also a dancer), says, “I think Scottish Highland dancing is fun to watch; the bagpipe music is toe-tappin’ and Highland dance is a fun, wholesome, cultural activity in which to have kids involved.”Each Highland dance is part of the Scottish tradition, including a sword dance that was performed before battle and the Highland Fling, which was danced over a shield. The Highland dances have a heavy ballet influence, characterized by graceful leaps that imitate the stag. Dancers perform the dances exactly as they were performed hundreds of years ago, wearing the same costumes. The kilts worn by the dancers are tartans that represent Scottish families, and many dancers like to research their Scottish roots so that they can wear their own family tartan.As for Groeschel, Mary and Emma’s teacher, she takes students all over Northern California to perform and recently took Devon Yip of El Dorado Hills to Scotland for the world championships at the Premier level, and Devon came in sixth in the world in Seann Triubhas (a Highland dance of celebration). She was also second overall in the North American Championships and third in the United States.Not only are Groeschel’s students accomplished dancers, but she is a wonderful teacher, as well. “She’s very kind and loving,” says Laura. “The kids love to do their best for her.” Mary adds, “Kyla is awesome!”The feeling is mutual. “I love those kids,” says Groeschel of Emma and Mary. “They have a spirit for their dancing that comes from within. They dance with more than a love of the culture – they dance for the love of dancing, and it shows.”For more information or to contact the Highland School of Dance, visit highlanddance.com.

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Neighboring Points of View

Oct 31, 2008 ● By Super Admin

I have a neighbor. I’ll call him Les because...well, that’s his name. Les is a great neighbor. Retired, he and his wife and his mother-in-law live next door. We trade gardening tips, gripe about the Kings, and watch over each other’s homes when the other is away. Les and I agree about a lot of things. But when it comes to politics, he has his side of the fence and I have mine.Les leans conservative. And while I am a registered independent, I vote democrat more often than not. Hey, my mom is an 84 year-old Roosevelt supporter, still in possession of the campaign buttons to prove it. And my dad, while a little more moderate, was a lot like his beloved ‘74 Galaxy 500: he, too, pulled to the left. It’s my destiny. But I try to remain open-minded. I try to see things as objectively as possible. I really do.These days, especially, in a politically charged year, it’s easy to stay on your own side of the fence. Radio shows, chat rooms, television news networks - if you don’t want to have a real discussion, you don’t have to. And most of us don’t. Who would? Most political discourse on TV or radio has been reduced to blustery tirades by self-important blowhards who would refuse to listen even if Paul Harvey started slamming them in the side of the head with a Bose Wave radio. And don’t even mention political advertising; I would rather sit through a hundred Labor Day Weekend Sell-A-Thon commercials from the local auto mall. Anyway, watch or hear enough of that and it’s easy to start thinking that all discussions of a political nature will only end up the verbal equivalent of a European soccer riot. Why bother?So this is where it gets back to my neighbor Les. Les and I have had some…ah, “healthy” discussions over the years. But even though we may be so far apart on a topic that we need Google Earth to find some middle ground, he is still able to discuss and to listen. He may think my point of view is about as silly as a tutu on a cow, but he’s always acknowledged my right to that opinion, without ever once displaying a dangerous increase in blood pressure. And, while there are times I definitely think his cows are dressed for the ballet too, I find myself still able to respect his point of view and remain within my own target heart range. Of course, there have been occasions when it has gotten a little tense, but if it gets to that, “hey…how ‘bout those Kings!” And once in a great while, we’ve even found ourselves looking at an issue in a way that we hadn’t considered before. Go figure. What we need to realize (and I think maybe finally we are) is that most of us are like Les: reasonable people who understand that just because someone doesn’t agree with them, it doesn’t mean they’ve got horns sprouting from their head and that a political discussion of opposing views doesn’t need to devolve into an episode of Jerry Springer! So even though the latest political season is over, there’s always another one not too far away. Next time, don’t be afraid to approach the fence. Your neighbor might be on the other side, wanting to do the same exact thing.Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1 KNCI.

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Medical Myths

Sep 30, 2008 ● By Super Admin

Medical information can be confusing. New data is continually released and is often appealing to the hopeful, the nervous and the health conscious. Style consulted with three local medical professionals and gathered some of the misperceptions they encounter on a regular basis, as well as the information to set the record straight.Mercy Hospital1. Antibiotics are a cure for the common cold. Antibiotic drugs only treat bacterial infections, not viral, and 70 percent of the time colds are viral.2. “Natural” or “herbal” remedies are safe or healthy. These remedies are not subjected to the rigorous FDA tests that prescription and over-the-counter medications are subject to. Furthermore, there are no studies to verify the effectiveness, nor oversight of production. 3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can diagnose any problem you have. It cannot! An MRI is just a different type of internal image – it is by no means the answer to every question.4. More medicine is better. Bothersome afflictions may cause patients to take more medication than is recommended. High dosages often provide no additional effectiveness but may increase the risk of organ failure.5. Vaccines cause autism. This has been unproven by several studies, some of which were publicly funded by the governments of Canada and the United Kingdom.— Family physician Kristine Burke, M.D.For Medical Myths numbers six through 15, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Nashville

Sep 30, 2008 ● By Super Admin

The United States is a country so large and diverse that a domestic trip can feel like an international one. Perhaps no regional contrast is starker than that between the casual West Coast and the decorous South. With its gentle yet dignified pace, signature drawl and profound sense of tradition, the American South is a veritable nation within a nation. Nashville, Tennessee is known as “The Athens of the South,” a moniker that refers to its proud heritage of higher education. This vibrant city also resembles classical Athens in its increasingly cosmopolitan character, its wealth of cultural outlets, and in the civic pride that is evident among its residents. Unless you’re a country music aficionado, Nashville may not be the first place that you think of when you’re planning a getaway, but with all of its charm, style and hospitality, it’s time that this undervalued southern gem got some attention.What to DoWhat trip to Nashville, proudly nicknamed “Music City,” would be complete without a stop at its most popular attraction, the legendary Grand Ole Opry? With performances on Tuesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, it’s easy to catch some of country music’s biggest and most respected acts in concert. Shows take place in the Grand Ole Opry House, adjacent to Gaylord Opryland. Downtown Nashville is also home to several historic country music venues. The must-visit of these is the Country Music Hall of Fame, which houses not only a museum, restaurant, and historic print shop, but also hosts weekly concerts featuring country legends and contemporary stars. Don’t be fooled into thinking that the city is just a haven for country buffs, however. Downtown’s Ryman Auditorium is a nearly 120-year-old National Historic Landmark that hosts musicians and performers from all genres– everyone from Johnny Cash to Jon Stewart, from James Brown to Coldplay, has performed on its stage.Believe it or not, music isn’t Nashville’s only selling point. Take a break at Riverfront Park along the banks of the Cumberland River and view the Nashville skyline (including the famous AT&T “Batman” Building– you’ll know it when you see it!), or take a cruise on the General Jackson Showboat, a majestic paddlewheel riverboat that operates out of Gaylord Opryland. Right off of the Cumberland are 1st and 2nd Avenues, where you will find a vast array of shops, restaurants, and venues such as B.B. King’s Blues Club. Art lovers won’t want to miss the opportunity to visit the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, located on main thoroughfare Broadway, or the Parthenon, a full-scale replica of the classical Athenian site, which is located in Centennial Park and houses the city art museum. History buffs won’t be disappointed either– historic sites such as The Hermitage, home of President Andrew Jackson, and Natchez Trace Parkway, an original trail traveled by Native Americans and European explorers, are located a short drive’s distance from downtown. Downtown itself is home to sites such as Fort Nashborough, a reconstructed monument to Nashville’s original settlers, and Jefferson Street, a historical African-American district that hosts an annual Jazz and Blues Festival.For more on Nashville, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Style: Folsom | El Dorado Hills
Local Area Tidbits

Sep 30, 2008 ● By Super Admin

This issue marks the fourth anniversary of our Readers’ Choice Awards! Inside you’ll find your top picks for community businesses, figures and organizations. The competition is tough, and it gets tougher every year as more excellent businesses join our community. Look out for a new Original Pete’s Restaurant and Brewhouse coming to El Dorado Hills Town Center in October…Commerce Bank of Folsom, located on Prairie City Road, has officially changed its name to Sierra Vista Bank, and they will open a new branch in Cameron Park later this year. For more information, call 916-850-1500 or visit sierravistabank.com...On November 1, join thousands in The Food Bank of El Dorado County’s Walk For Hunger 5K. Check-in is at 7 a.m. where the walk will start and end in El Dorado Hills Town Center. The post-walk celebration begins at 10 a.m. Register online at foodbankedc.org, or call 916-939-6674...Congratulations to scholarship winners from Folsom Lake College: Shauna McElroy, a mother of two from Folsom working toward a degree in business, is the first Folsom Lake College student to receive the prestigious national Jeannette Rankin Foundation scholarship. Recipients of the Folsom Lake College Foundation scholarships for 2008-2009 are: Terri Buhlert, Alisha Jackson, Karissa Lukk, Stanislav Pribytkovsky, Hannah Rufer, Ashley Selsted-Sianez, and Jeffrey Taylor...For more information about the Center, call 916-255-0717…Younger students can start paving their way to academic success with a little homework help at the Folsom Public Library. The Library Web site offers Brainfuse, a free online tutoring program in which students in grades 3-12 can be connected to expert tutors (including Spanish-speaking tutors) in math, science, social studies, English and writing. For more information on how to access the program, call 916-355-7372…The Folsom Focus Photography Contest is now open! Contestants in three age groups (under 12, 12-17, and 18 & older) have until October 27 to submit up to five entries, selecting from six photographic themes. For more information, visit patronsofthearts.org...Congratulations to El Dorado Hills-Folsom real estate agent Cheri Elliott – a former 14-time national and world champion in BMX and mountain bike racing! She was recently inducted into the US Bicycling Hall of Fame…Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance (SARTA) announced their Elly Award nominees...Folsom’s Imprint Theatre Company received five nominations, Stage Nine Theatre of Folsom received twenty-two, Folsom High School received nine, and El Dorado Musical Theatre received thirty-one. Bravo! Check out the results at sarta.com...It’s October and local organizations are offering plenty of family Halloween night activities. The annual CSD Halloween Carnival takes place on Saturday, October 25. For more information, call 916-614-3216. El Dorado Hills Town Center will be holding its Third Annual Pumpkin Jubilee from 4 to 6 p.m. on October 31. Call 916-933-6699 for more information...That’s all for now, but check in next month as we ring in the holiday season with our annual Thanksgiving issue! Do you have newsworthy tidbits for our What's Up column? Send it to us at info@sierrastyle.com.

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Family Challenges

Sep 30, 2008 ● By Super Admin

When a new school year starts there are often new challenges for families with kids of different ages and stages. Families with younger children scramble to balance the independent and the dependent needs of their little ones; while new “empty nesters” sometimes discover that they have neglected their marriage for years. The solutions to these challenges aren’t always the same for every family, but they do require sensitivity and connection to the individual needs of each person. What challenges are you facing this year?Q: Our son is now a sophomore in college and I’m itching to do something different with his room. Is it too soon to convert it or do you think it’s OK?A: Yes, it is your house, but consider how such a conversion can be done in a way that is sensitive to your son’s feelings. In converting his old room, try to leave something that will maintain the feeling that it was once his room, at least until he finishes school. College students who live away from home usually look forward to home visits and he will probably be sleeping there again. However you plan to change his room, consider his unique temperament and how it may affect his transition from the nest into the world.Bob Parkins lives in Folsom and is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He can be reached at 916-337-5406 or <a target="_blank" href="mailto:info@bobparkinslmft.com">info@bobparkinslmft.com</a>.For more Q & As, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Curb Cravings

Sep 30, 2008 ● By Super Admin

In this sluggish housing market, we know that buyers can afford to be choosy. The slightest thing can make all the difference to a homebuyer these days. So if you’re looking to sell, or simply to do your part to make your neighborhood a little snazzier, improving your curb appeal is just the thing to do.Erin Attardi, Executive Associate Realtor for Lyon Real Estate has sold many homes in Roseville and Folsom areas. “Buyers make an emotional connection with the home they ultimately purchase and want to see themselves living there,” she says. “If a buyer is turned off by the home’s exterior appearance, they immediately think that [it is a] reflection of the interior’s condition.”The exterior may be the last thing on a seller’s priority list of updates to be made before putting their home on the market, but the importance of curb appeal should not be underestimated. “I have had buyers in my car ask me to keep driving when we have pulled up to a home with an unkempt front yard. The interior could have been spotless, but those buyers would have never known,” Attardi adds.With so many more homes that on the market that meet a buyer’s specifications, enhanced curb appeal could give your home an edge over those that are not as appealing upon first glance.Rest assured, though, there are several things a homeowner can do to improve the first impression of potential buyers. If you have no idea where to start, the experts suggest figuring out a budget first. “Creating a master plan will allow you to phase the work as time and your budget will allow,” explains Jeff Ambrosia, principal at Yamasaki Landscape Architects in Auburn. “A licensed landscape contractor can walk you through the process and help you anticipate your needs and desires. They will then put this information to paper and create a set of landscape construction documents that will allow you successfully send your project out to bid to contractors,” Ambrosia says.If you’re more inclined to do-it-yourself projects, cleaning up your home’s exterior doesn’t need to be a chore. According to Debby Evans, owner and principal designer of Folsom’s Debby Evans Garden Designs, “If you will be doing the work yourself, there are many worthy Websites and periodicals that illustrate how to spruce up a garden. The Master Gardener Association of Sacramento County is very helpful,” she says.The easiest approach? Prune overgrown trees and shrubs, pull the weeds, and mow and edge the lawn. As trivial as that may seem, simple yard maintenance can make a tremendous difference in attracting buyers and make a good first impression. Kiel Myers, owner and president of Myers Landscape, Inc. in Folsom suggests updating the look of the yard. “Many yards that are overgrown and/or outdated can be spruced up with a clean up, new plant selections, and new bark mulch,” he says. Plus clearing and trimming allows more light to shine in the yard, which helps to give off an airy, bright, welcoming feeling to visitors and potential buyers.Some other easy fixes: power-wash the driveway, front walkways, and front siding of your home. Plant colorful flowers, replace existing exterior lights with new, contemporary fixtures on either side of the garage and on the front porch near the door. Consider adding landscape lighting to accent all your hard work. And of course, if time allows, a fresh coat of paint couldn’t hurt. With a little effort, increasing your curb appeal can be an easy, effective way to give your home the edge it needs to sell.

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The Vine

Sep 30, 2008 ● By Super Admin

2005 Baron Philippe de Rothschild Escudo Rojo The foundation of the Rothschild name was taken to new heights in the wine world when Baron Nathaniel de Rothschild purchased property formerly known as Chateau Brane-Mouton and renamed it Chateau Mouton-Rothschild. In 1922, his great grandson, Baron Philippe de Rothschild become one of the best wine producers in the world.In the fine Bordeaux tradition,  today’s Baron Philippe de Rothschild S.A. began a new venture in Chile and in 2003 he created Escudo Rojo with the founding of a Bodgea in Maipo, Chile. Escudo Rojo is a classic Bordeaux-style blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenère, Syrah and Cabernet Franc. The 2005 vintage drinks like a wine two to three times its cost, and at under $15 a bottle, it is an exceptionally great value. It shows a harmonious balance of ripe cherry, black currant, and raspberry flavors with subtle characters of vanilla and desirable mature tannin, then finishes long and silky. This is a wine to swoon over.—Rick MindermannRick is a 30-year veteran grocer with Corti Brothers in Sacramento,personal assistant to Darrell Corti, and “The Good Taste Guy” for oodleboxtv.com.For more wine reviews, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at gloria@sierrastyle.com, or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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